The Death of a Son, The Death of a Star

In the early morning, before the sun rises, a mother should feel like her children are safe. They are home,  protected from the perils of the outside world. She would never expect to wake to find her child, gone forever.

Early this week, I learned that a longtime friend lost her baby.  His father lost his only son. Their teenage child  took his own life, and now they will never see him grow up, go to college, get married, have his own children, change the world. A sister has lost her big brother. She will no longer have him to look up to, get advice from, be protected by.

It was a beautiful, warm, and sunny fall day, and it should not have started with the death of a child. How dare the world keep moving; people eating, sleeping, laughing, dancing.  This family has lost a child, and it feels like everything should stop, if just for a day. Of course, that’s not possible. People die everyday, but at times like this, when someone close to you is grieving, and you are grieving for them, it feels like it should. It’s so much worse when it is a child.

I never knew Adam, but I wish I had. I have learned that he was an extremely bright and talented boy. He was full of life. A friend to everyone. He could play just about any instrument he picked up, and was very involved in his community theatre program. He  knew more about any given topic, than many adults. Nothing went unquestioned. It was his endless quest to learn about the world, and dream of a better tomorrow.

As with many highly intelligent people, Adam was quirky, and thus tended to be bullied at school. He had been depressed for quite some time, and I’m sure the bullying was wearing on him. His family and friends were trying to help him through these tough times, but sometimes it’s hard to get through to someone who thinks they can handle it themselves. He was a compassionate soul, who wanted to spend his time uplifting, and helping, others. He loved to make people laugh.  He brought light to so many lives, while silently, his grew darker. He wanted to be strong, and self-sufficient, but he didn’t have the tools to deal with something so dark and cruel.

The despair overwhelmed him, and he couldn’t see the light. He couldn’t figure out how to climb out of the dark hole of pain he found himself in. On Monday of this week, a child took his own life. He would never have wanted to hurt his family, he was beyond the point of realizing what the aftermath would be like for his loved ones. His pain was a thick, black fog. Overtaking him little by little until he was lost.

As I stood in front of poster boards full of pictures of Adam, I saw so much light and life in him. It is hard to fathom having him there one day, and gone the next. How do you continue on after your child has died? Are all of those wonderful memories enough? I know for me, the belief in Heaven comforts me. Hoping that he has found his younger brother, and grandparents that passed before him. I am usually too uncomfortable to approach the deceased at a funeral home. I pray for them from afar, but not this time. I had a chat with Adam during the visitation. I told him that I hoped he had found peace, and that I wished he could have found another way. I asked him to watch over his sister and parents, to protect his family.

This morning, on my way to the funeral, a rainbow stretched across the expressway, on a beautiful, sunny day, with a spattering of raindrops on my windshield from one tiny cloud in the sky. I fumbled with my phone for a bit trying to get a picture. It seemed to remain in the sky for longer than it  should, until I finally got a few shots. I put down my phone, looked up, and it was gone. I thanked Adam, and God. I have no doubt that rainbow was from him.

As the funeral started, in the auditorium which I imagine his plays were performed, a place where he most likely found reprieve from his sadness, I looked back to a standing-room-only crowd. It was full of students, parents, teachers, friends, family, and maybe even some who knew neither him, or his family. Strangers come together in a small community like his, especially when a child dies so tragically, and unexpectedly. As the music began, chills ran down my spine. It was “Over the Rainbow”  by Israel Kamakawiwoʻole. I later learned It was his favorite song. He loved to listen to the song, and then play it on his ukulele, interchanging over and over again. I get it. You’re watching. Well played, Adam, well played.

10 thoughts on “The Death of a Son, The Death of a Star

  1. SHUTTHATNEGATIVENOISEOFF! says:

    ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL THAT THE RAINBOW COMFORTED YOU AND ADAM LET YOU KNOW HE’S HOME (HEAVEN AND REJOICING) HE IS NO LONGER IN DARKNESS AND GOD ONLY KNOWS WHEN HE DECIDES WHICH PEOPLE BECOME ANGELS FIRST. TRULY TOUCHED ME BECAUSE I LOST ALMOST HALF OF MY FAMILY. AND, WITH EVERY DEATH, I WANTED THE WORLD TO STOP, TO NOT LAUGH, TO NOT DANCE, TO SEE MY PAIN. I UNDERSTAND. MUCH LOVE, LIGHT AND BLESSINGS, EMMA

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Kathryn says:

    I live on the other side of the world in Italy, and didn’t know Adam either, and only learned of his death through a FB message from someone I have never met, but is on my contact list. And when I read the stories about this fine young man, with so much potential, cut down so short by his own hand, I felt greatly saddened. I have a son who also suffers from depression, many years older than Adam, but my concerns that he will do something similar are always there. My heart goes out to his family, friends and the community at large as they try to draw comfort from his short life and deal with the hole that has been created by his death.

    Liked by 1 person

    • superfiveshanghai says:

      Thank you for the comments, and for sharing your story. I have depression in my family as well, so I understand completely. Mental illness awareness is a cause near and dear to me. I hope your son has the help he needs, and finds a way back to happiness. Beth

      Like

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